Canadian Human Rights Institutions

The Canadian Human Rights Institutions Interactive Map highlights the robust landscape of human rights institutions across the country.

The interactive map includes federal, provincial and territorial human rights commissions and tribunals, as well as other legislated institutions, such as ombudsman offices, information and privacy commissions, and children and youth advocates, or the provincial and territorial equivalents to these offices. The scope of work, relevant legislation, and the link to the respective website are provided.

This is an ongoing, living project. The map is regularly updated to ensure it is both comprehensive and current.

Map legend. red with star: federal level institutions; orange: human rights commissions and tribunals; green: Ombudsman; blue: child and youth advocates; yellow: information and privacy commissions; light green: language commissions.

 

Institution Legislation Description
Canadian Human Rights Commission Canadian Human Rights Act The Commission protects the core principle of equal opportunity and promotes a vision of an inclusive society free from discrimination by: promoting human rights through research and policy development; protecting human rights through a fair and effective complaints process; representing the public interest to advance human rights for all Canadians; and auditing employers under federal jurisdiction for compliance with employment equity.
Canadian Human Rights Tribunal Canadian Human Rights Act and Employment Equity Act The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal’s role is much like that of a court. It hears evidence and witnesses about complaints of discrimination; decides whether discrimination has occurred; and, if so, determines an appropriate remedy. The Tribunal can only hear complaints of discrimination filed against federally regulated employers and service providers. These include: federal government departments, agencies and Crown corporations (including the Canadian Forces and the RCMP); chartered banks; airlines; television and radio stations; interprovincial communications and telephone companies; interprovincial transportation companies; First Nations governments and some other First Nations organizations.
Alberta Human Rights Commission and Tribunal Alberta Human Rights Act The Commission has a two-fold mandate: to foster equality and to reduce discrimination. It fulfills this mandate through public education and community initiatives, through the resolution and settlement of complaints of discrimination, and through human rights tribunal and court hearings.
British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal B.C. Human Rights Code The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal is an independent, quasi-judicial body created by the B.C. Human Rights Code. The Tribunal is responsible for accepting, screening, mediating, and adjudicating human rights complaints. The Tribunal offers the parties to a complaint the opportunity to try to resolve the complaint through mediation. Respondents have an opportunity to respond to a complaint and to apply to dismiss a complaint without a hearing. If the parties do not resolve a complaint and the complaint is not dismissed, the Tribunal holds a hearing.
Québec Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse (Québec Commission of Human Rights and Youth Rights) Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms; Youth Protection Act; Youth Criminal Justice Act; Act respecting equal access to employment in public bodies The Commission has the mandate to promote and uphold the rights set forth in the Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, which are recognized to every person, including children. Furthermore, the Commission must ensure, by any appropriate measures, that the rights of the children and adolescents affected by an intervention under the Youth Protection Act or the Youth Criminal Justice Act are respected.
Le Tribunal des droits de la personne (Québec Human Rights Tribunal) Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms The Tribunal is independent and exercises an exclusive adjudicatory function. It hears cases in divisions of three members, composed of either the President or a judge assigned by the President, and two assessors who assist and advise the President or the judge. The Tribunal is different from other specialized human rights adjudicatory bodies in Canada, namely in that its divisions are presided over by judges of the Court of Québec. Any person wishing to institute proceedings before the Tribunal because he believes that he has been the victim of discrimination, harassment or exploitation prohibited by the Charter must first file a complaint with the Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse (section 74). Out of a concern for access for all, the Tribunal sits in all judicial districts of Québec (section 119).
Manitoba Human Rights Commission Manitoba Human Rights Code The Manitoba Human Rights Commission is the agency responsible for carrying out the provisions of The Human Rights Code (Manitoba). It is an arms-length agency, funded by the Manitoba Government. The Commission enforces the anti-discrimination provisions of The Code through its complaint process. Anyone, including a group or organization, can file a complaint if it is believed that a practice or policy results in unreasonable discrimination. In determining whether discrimination has occurred, it is the effect, not the intention that counts.
Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission Nova Scotia Human Rights Act The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (NSHRC) has a unique role within Nova Scotia. It is an independent government agency charged with administering the Nova Scotia Human Rights Act, a provincial statute created in 1969, with the most recent amendments in November 2012. The NSHRC is mandated by the Act to help build inclusive communities and protect human rights in Nova Scotia.
Ontario Human Rights Commission Ontario Human Rights Code The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is one part of Ontario’s system for human rights. The OHRC plays an important role in preventing discrimination and promoting and advancing human rights in Ontario. The OHRC: Develops public policy on human rights; actively promotes a culture of human rights in the province; conducts public inquiries; intervenes in proceedings at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (HRTO); initiates our own applications (formerly called ‘complaints’); engages in proactive measures to prevent discrimination using public education, policy development, research and analysis; brings people and communities together to help resolve issues of “tension and conflict”; the OHRC has the power to monitor and report on anything related to the state of human rights in the Province of Ontario. This includes reviewing legislation and policies for consistency with the intent of the Code.
Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario Ontario Human Rights Code The HRTO resolves claims of discrimination and harassment brought under the Human Rights Code in a fair, just and timely way. The HRTO first offers parties the opportunity to settle the dispute through mediation. If the parties do not agree to mediation, or mediation does not resolve the application, the HRTO holds a hearing. The HRTO is one of the eight tribunals that make up Social Justice Tribunals Ontario (SJTO). Social Justice Tribunals Ontario (SJTO) is a cluster of eight adjudicative tribunals with a mandate to resolve applications and appeals brought under statutes relating to child and family services oversight, youth justice, human rights, residential tenancies, compensation for victims of violent crime, disability support and other social assistance, and special education.
Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission Saskatchewan Human Rights Code The SHRC is mandated to promote and protect the individual dignity, fundamental freedoms and equal rights of Saskatchewan citizens, under The Saskatchewan Human Rights Code. It seeks to discourage and eliminate discrimination; Investigate and resolve discrimination complaints quickly and effectively; Support and seek remedies for individuals and groups who suffer discrimination; Promote, approve and monitor equity programs; Promote research and education strategies to advance the principles of equality and diversity, and to encourage understanding of human rights issues; Promote leadership on human rights related public policy development and implementation; and Promote advances in human rights legislation and protection.
New Brunswick Human Rights Commission New Brunswick’s Human Rights Act The New Brunswick Human Rights Commission is the government agency responsible for the administration of the Human Rights Act. The mandate of the Commission as described in the Act is: to forward the principle that every person is free and equal with dignity and respect; to promote an understanding of, acceptance of, and compliance with the Act; and to develop and conduct educational programs designed to eliminate discriminatory practices; to administer the mechanism for complaint intake and resolution.
Prince Edward Island Human Rights Commission Human Rights Act The Prince Edward Island Human Rights Commission is an independent body that administers and enforces the Prince Edward Island Human Rights Act. The Act establishes a complaint process for the investigation and adjudication of complaints. The Commission also develops programs of public information and education about human rights.
Newfoundland and Labrador Human Rights Commission Newfoundland and Labrador Human Rights Code The mandate of the Human Rights Commission is contained in Section 23 of the Human Rights Act. The purpose of the Commission is to receive, record and investigate individual’s written complaints that allege violation of the Human Rights Act; to promotion of the Human Rights Act; to education and research designed to eliminate discriminatory conduct; and to advise and help individuals, groups, organizations and governments on matters related to human rights.
Yukon Human Rights Commission Yukon Human Rights Act The Yukon Human Rights Commission promotes equality and diversity through research, education and enforcement of the Yukon Human Rights Act.
Yukon Human Rights Board of Adjudication Yukon Human Rights Act As part of the human rights complaint process, the Yukon Human Rights Commission may refer a complaint to the Human Rights Board of Adjudication, which will hold a hearing and make a decision as to whether a complaint is proven or not. The Board of Adjudication is entirely independent of the Yukon Human Rights Commission and has a separate administration. The Board of Adjudication does not have its own website at this time. Hearings and decisions of the Board are public.
Nunavut Human Rights Tribunal Nunavut Human Rights Act In Nunavut the Human Rights Tribunal consists of five people who are appointed by the Government of Nunavut to hear and settle cases of discrimination under the Nunavut Human Rights Act. The Nunavut Human Rights Tribunal is a direct access model unlike its counterparts in other territories and provinces which have commissions. Therefore, the Tribunal does not investigate or gather evidence. All decisions by the Tribunal are made on the bases of information presented in a notification (documents presented during the application of a complaint).
Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission NWT Human Rights Act The NWT Human Rights Commission is an agency that works to promote equality human rights and protect individuals and groups from discrimination under the NWT Human Rights Act. The Human Rights Commission is separate from the GNWT. The Human Rights Commission includes the members of the Commission, the Director, the Adjudication Panel and the staff of the Director and the Adjudication Panel.
Northwest Territories Human Rights Adjudication Panel NWT Human Rights Act The Human Rights Adjudication Panel is a statutory office created under Part 5 of the Northwest Territories Human Rights Act. We are an independent statutory office. We operate independently from both private and public organizations, including the Government of the Northwest Territories, the Human Rights Commission and the Director of Human Rights. The Panel has two primary functions, namely to decide whether the Director of Human Rights has made a fair and reasonable decision to dismiss a filed Complaint (this is called the “Appeal” function); and, whether a Complaint which has been referred by the Director of Human Rights to the Panel has been proven and, if so, what remedy is appropriate (this is called the “Referral” function).
 

Institution Legislation Description
Alberta Ombudsman Alberta’s Ombudsman Act The Alberta Ombudsman provides oversight of the provincial government to ensure fair treatment through independent investigations, recommendations and education.
British Columbia Office of the Ombudsperson Ombudsperson Act, Coastal Ferry Act, Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Policy Act and Victims of Crime Act The Office of the Ombudsperson can help determine whether provincial public authorities have acted fairly and reasonably – and whether their actions and decisions were consistent with relevant legislation, policies and procedures. As an independent statutory office of the provincial legislature, our services are provided free of charge.
Manitoba Ombudsman Manitoba Ombudsman Act, Freedom of Information and Privacy Act, Public Interest Disclosure (Whistleblower Protection) Act, Fatality Inquiries Act and Child and Family Services Act. To promote and foster openness, transparency, fairness, accountability, and respect for privacy in the design and delivery of public services. Manitoba Ombudsman is an independent office of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba and is not part of any government department or agency. The ombudsman conducts independent, impartial, and non-partisan investigations on complaints about access to information and privacy matters, the fairness of government actions or decisions, or serious ‘wrongdoings’ that you believe may have occurred.
Nova Scotia Office of the Ombudsman Nova Scotia Ombudsman Act; Public Interest Disclosure of Wrongdoing Act The Office of the Ombudsman is required by statute to investigate and respond to citizens concerns arising from the administration of provincial and municipal laws within Nova Scotia. The Office may also initiate own motion investigations, systemic issues, and matters referred to it by a Committee of the House. Under the Provincial Civil Service Disclosure of Wrongdoing Regulations, the Ombudsman is granted authority to investigate claims brought forward by provincial civil servants regarding allegations of wrongdoing in the workplace.
Ontario Ombudsman The Ombudsman Act The Ombudsman of Ontario is an Officer of the Provincial Legislature who is independent of government and political parties. The Ombudsman’s job is to ensure government accountability through effective oversight of the administration of government services. The Ombudsman is appointed for a five-year renewable term and his powers and authorities are contained in legislation under the Ombudsman Act.
Ombudsman Saskatchewan The Ombudsman Act Our mission is to promote and protect fairness and integrity in the design and delivery of government services.
New Brunswick Ombudsman Ombudsman Act, Civil Services Act, Archives Act, Public Interest Disclosure Act and Lobbyist Registration Act The New Brunswick Ombudsman is an officer of the Legislative Assembly, and is independent of government.
Yukon Ombudsman Yukon Ombudsman Act The Ombudsman promotes and protects fairness in the delivery of government and other public services. If you are a citizen and have been treated unfairly when engaging these services, we will work to resolve the unfairness. The Ombudsman also works proactively with Authorities to assist them in delivering services more fairly.
 

Institution Legislation Description
Alberta Office of the Child and Youth Advocate Child, Youth Family and Enhancement Act and the Protection of Sexually Exploited Children Act The mandate of the Child and Youth Advocate is to provide individual and systemic advocacy for children and youth receiving services under the Child, Youth Family and Enhancement Act, the Protection of Sexually Exploited Children Act, and youth involved with the youth criminal justice system, referred to as “designated services”. In carrying out this role the Advocate represents and promotes the rights, interests and viewpoints of children and youth. The Office of the Child and Youth Advocate also provides legal representation to children and youth in matters under the Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act and the Protection of Sexually Exploited Children Act.
British Columbia Office of the Representative for Children and Youth Representative for Children and Youth Act, Child, Family and Community Services Act and Justice Act Advocate on behalf of children, youth and young adults to improve their understanding of and access to designated services; Monitor, review, audit and publicly report on designated services for children and youth; and Conduct independent reviews and investigations into the critical injuries or deaths of children receiving reviewable services.
Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse Québec Charte des droits et libertés de la personne du Québec, Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse The Commission has the mandate to promote and uphold the rights set forth in the Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, which are recognized to every person, including children. Furthermore, the Commission must ensure, by any appropriate measures, that the rights of the children and adolescents affected by an intervention under the Youth Protection Act or the Youth Criminal Justice Act are respected.
Manitoba Office of the Children’s Advocate The Child and Family Services Act, (Amended September 15, 2008 to include The Children’s Advocate Enhanced Mandate Act); Adoption Act The mission of the Office of the Children’s Advocate is to ensure the voices of children and youth involved with the child welfare system are heard. As an independent office, we advocate for systemic change for the benefit of children and youth under The Child and Family Services Act and The Adoption Act.
Nova Scotia Office of the Ombudsman, Youth Services Ombudsman Act The mandate of the Office is to be accountable for ensuring the rights and interests of children and youth in care and custody of the government, including those in the custody of municipal police and the RCMP, are protected and advanced; particularly in relation to designated services and programs provided or funded under municipal and provincial legislation.
Ontario Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Act The Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth serves youth in State care and the margins of state care through individual, systemic and policy advocacy. The Office strives, at every level of its operation to be an exemplar of youth participation.
Saskatchewan Advocate for Children and Youth The Advocate for Children and Youth Act The Advocate is an independent officer of the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan and acts pursuant to The Advocate for Children and Youth Act.
New Brunswick Office of the Child and Youth Advocate Child and Youth Advocate Act, S.N.B. 2007 Chapter C-2.7 Section 2 of the legislation establishes the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate, and charges it with the following duties and responsibilities: (a) ensuring that the rights and interests of children and youths are protected; (b) ensuring that the views of children and youths are heard and considered in appropriate forums where those views might not otherwise be advanced; (c) ensuring that children and youths have access to services and that complaints that children and youths might have about those services receive appropriate attention; (d) providing information and advice to the government, government agencies and communities about the availability, effectiveness, responsiveness, and relevance of services to children and youths; and (e) acting as an advocate for the rights and interests of children and youths generally.
Newfoundland and Labrador Office of the Child and Youth Advocate An Act respecting the Child and Youth Advocate The Office of the Child and Youth Advocate (OCYA) was established with a mandate to: • Protect and advance the rights and interests of children and youth through the provision of advocacy services. • Ensure that children and youth have access to services and that their complaints receive appropriate attention. • Inform the public about the needs and rights of children and youth. • Provide information and advice to government, agencies of the government and to communities about the availability, effectiveness, responsiveness and relevance of services to children and youth. • Make recommendations to government regarding legislation, policies, programs and services designed to meet the needs of children and youth. • Conduct independent reviews and investigations. The Office provides services to any child or youth under the age of 19 years who is entitled to receive services from a department, agency or board of government. The age is extended to 21 years for youth who are or have been in a care or custody arrangement.
Yukon Child and Youth Advocate Office Child and Youth Advocate Act The Child and Youth Advocate Act describes the Advocate’s primary role as supporting, assisting, informing and advising children and youth regarding designated services. The Advocate can perform their duties when requested to do so by a child or youth receiving or eligible to receive designated services or by any other person. Designated services are defined by section 1 the Act as programs or services for children and youth provided: directly by a department, including schools under the jurisdiction of the Minister of Education; as part of a school by a school board established under the Education Act; and by a First Nation service authority.
Nunavut Representative for Children and Youth’s (RCY) Office Representative for Children and Youth Act The Representative for Children and Youth’s office was created to support children and youth in Nunavut in two broad areas. First, the office advocates for the rights and interests of children and youth. RCY staff work to amplify and, sometimes, represent their voice – individually and collectively – on issues that affect them. Second, the RCY’s office ensures the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut and the Government of Nunavut are accountable and responsive to the needs of Nunavut’s young people.
 

Institution Legislation Description
CHRC Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada Access to Information Act The Office of the Information Commissioner investigates complaints about federal institutions’ handling of access requests. The Information Commissioner has strong investigative powers to assist her in mediating between dissatisfied information applicants and government institutions. As an ombudsperson, the Commissioner may not order a complaint to be resolved in a particular way, though she may refer a case to the Federal Court for resolution.
CHRT Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada Privacy Act and Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act The mission of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) is to protect and promote the privacy rights of individuals. The Commissioner oversees compliance with both the Privacy Act, which covers the personal information-handling practices of federal government departments and agencies, and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, Canada’s federal private-sector privacy law. The Commissioner works independently from any other part of the government to investigate complaints from individuals with respect to the federal public sector and the private sector.
AHRC Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta Alberta’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Health Information Act, Personal Information Protection Act and Access to Motor Vehicle Information Regulation The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner is the regulatory body for the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, the Health Information Act and the Personal Information Protection Act. The Commissioner also conducts inquiries under the Access to Motor Vehicle Information Regulation.
BCHRT Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for British Columbia Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Personal Information Protection Act The Commissioner has the power to: Investigate, mediate and resolve appeals concerning access to information disputes, including issuing binding orders; Investigate and resolve privacy complaints; Initiate Commissioner-led investigations and audits of public bodies or organizations, if there are reasonable grounds of non-compliance or if it is in the public interest; Comment on the access and privacy implications of proposed legislation, programs or policies; Comment on the privacy implications of new technologies and/or data matching schemes; Conduct research into anything affecting access and privacy rights; an educate and inform the public about their access and privacy rights and the relevant laws.
QHRC Commission d’accès à l’information Loi sur l’accès aux documents des organismes publics et sur la protection des renseignements personnels (Loi sur l’accès), Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels dans le secteur privé (Loi sur la protection dans le secteur privé) La mission de la Commission d’accès à l’information consiste à promouvoir l’accès aux documents des organismes publics et la protection des renseignements personnels dans les secteurs public et privé, en assurer la surveillance et décider des demandes de révision et d’examen de mésentente qui lui sont présentées.
QHRC Manitoba Ombudsman, the Access and Privacy Division The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and the Personal Health Information Act (PHIA) The Access and Privacy Division is responsible for investigating complaints and reviewing compliance with access to information and protection of privacy rights under The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and The Personal Health Information Act (PHIA).
NSHRC Information and Privacy Commissioner for Nova Scotia Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Privacy Review Officer Act, Part XX of the Municipal Government Act, Personal Health Information Act – Bill No. 89 (as passed, with amendments), Personal Health Information Act (amended) – Bill No. 76 (as passed), Personal Information International Disclosure Protection Act and Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Nova Scotia is responsible for the overall administration of the NS OIPC and since 1999 the Review Officer has issued an annual report and tabled it in the Legislature. The Commissioner is an independent ombudsman appointed by the Governor in Council for a term of five to seven years. The Commissioner accepts appeals, known as Requests for Review, from applicants or third parties who are not satisfied with the response they received from a public body or health custodian as a result of an application pursuant to the legislation. The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy legislation includes an opportunity for an independent review by the Commissioner. The NS OIPC staff supports the Commissioner in resolving freedom of information and privacy matters through research, investigation, analysis informal resolution and mediation. If a matter cannot be settled through informal resolution or through mediation, it is referred to the Review Officer for consideration. The Commissioner does not have the power to make final and binding orders, but can require a public body to produce any document for review, or enter and inspect any premises occupied by a public body. Once a review has concluded and the Commissioner has considered the arguments of both parties, the Commissioner will produce a report which may make recommendations to the public body. The public body is obligated to respond to these recommendations in writing. If the applicant or a third party is not satisfied with the outcome of a review, an appeal may be made to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.
CHRC Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Personal Health Information Protection Act The role of the Information and Privacy Commissioner is set out in three statutes: the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Personal Health Information Protection Act. The IPC acts independently of government to uphold and promote open government and the protection of personal privacy. Under the three Acts, the Information and Privacy Commissioner: Resolves access to information appeals and complaints when government or health care practitioners and organizations refuse to grant requests for access or correction; Investigates complaints with respect to personal information held by government or health care practitioners and organizations; Conducts research into access and privacy issues; Comments on proposed government legislation and programs; and Educates the public about Ontario’s access and privacy laws.
MHRC Saskatchewan Information and Privacy Commissioner The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIP), the Local Authority Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (LA FOIP) and the Health Information Protection Act (HIPA) The IPC ensures that public bodies respect the privacy and access rights of the citizens of Saskatchewan by: Informing members of the public of their information rights; Resolving access and privacy disputes between individuals and public bodies; Making recommendations on appeals from access to information decisions by public bodies; Investigating and resolving privacy complaints; Issuing recommendations on public bodies’ policies and practices; Commenting on proposed laws and policies.
OHRC New Brunswick Office of the Access to Information and Privacy Commissioner New Brunswick’s Right to Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Personal Health Information Privacy and Access Act The Office of the Commissioner was created to oversee the application of rules governing access to information and the protection of privacy in the public and health care sectors under the Right to Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Personal Health Information Privacy and Access Act. The Commissioner is a statutory officer of the Legislative Assembly and is independent of government. The Commissioner’s Office conducts independent and confidential investigations to ensure that access and privacy rights under these two laws are being upheld and respected.
SHRC Prince Edward Island Information and Privacy Commissioner Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act The Information and Privacy Commissioner will accept appeals, known as Requests for Review, from applicants or third parties who are not satisfied with the response they receive from a public body as a result of an access to information request made under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. The Commissioner has the power to make final and binding orders. The Commissioner also has the power to require a public body to produce any document for the Commissioner’s review that the Commissioner feels is relevant. The Commissioner may enter and inspect any premises occupied by a public body. Once a review has concluded and the Commissioner has considered the arguments of both parties and the relevant sections of the Act, the Commissioner will make a decision that may include an order requiring the public body to do something. The public body is obliged to comply with the Commissioner’s order. The Commissioner’s order is final; however, the applicant, the public body, or a third party may make an application for judicial review to the Supreme Court of Prince Edward Island. The Commissioner also accepts and investigates privacy complaints. Privacy investigations may also lead to a decision and order; however, the Commissioner may first attempt to resolve the complaint between the parties. The Commissioner is responsible for the overall administration of the Commissioner’s office. The Commissioner reports annually to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly on the work of the Commissioner’s office and matters relating to freedom of information and protection of privacy, as the Commissioner considers appropriate.
OHRC Newfoundland and Labrador Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act, 2015 and Personal Health Information Act Newfoundland and Labrador’s Information and Privacy Commissioner is an independent Officer of the House of Assembly. The Commissioner has a broad range of responsibilities and powers under both the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act, 2015 (ATIPPA, 2015) and the Personal Health Information Act (PHIA).Oversight of these Acts includes conducting reviews of decisions and investigating and attempting to resolve complaints about access to information and protection of privacy involving public bodies under the ATIPPA, 2015 and custodians of personal health information under the PHIA. The Commissioner may also make recommendations in order to uphold the Acts and encourage better compliance.
OHRC Yukon Information and Privacy Commissioner Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act The Information and Privacy Commissioner (IPC) is responsibile for ensuring that citizens have access to information held by Public Bodies and their personal information is protected. If you were denied access to information you are entitled to or your privacy was violated, we will work to provide you access and protect your privacy. The IPC also works proactively with Public Bodies to make information more accessible and to better protect privacy.
OHRC Yukon Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner Public Interest Disclosure of Wrongdoing Act The Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner (PIDC) is responsible to investigate disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints about reprisal. If you disclose a wrongdoing, we will work to correct the wrongdoing. If you are reprised against, we will work to ensure you are protected. The PIDC also works with Public Entities to develop internal disclosure procedures that are fair and confidential.
OHRC Information and Privacy Commissioner of Nunavut Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act The Information and Privacy Commissioner is an independent Officer of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut who fulfills a number of roles as defined by the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act.The Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act has two objectives. Firstly, to allow the public a means to obtain information which the government or a government body holds. The second is to ensure that private, personal information which is held by a government agency is used only for the purpose it was intended and is not improperly disclosed to anyone either inside or outside of government. Access to information requests are handled by coordinators within each department of the Government of Nunavut. Issues of personal privacy are dealt with directly by the Information and Privacy Commissioner.
OHRC Northwest Territories Information and Privacy Commissioner Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act The Information and Privacy Commissioner is an independent Officer of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut who fulfills a number of roles as defined by the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act.The Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act has two objectives. First, to allow the public a means to obtain information which the government or a government body holds, and second, is to ensure that private, personal information which is held by a government agency is used only for the purpose it was intended and is not improperly disclosed to anyone either inside or outside of government. Access to information requests are handled by coordinators within each department of the Government of Nunavut. Issues of personal privacy are dealt with directly by the Information and Privacy Commissioner.
 

Institution Legislation Description
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages Official Languages Act The Commissioner of Official Languages of Canada therefore has a mandate to take all measures within his power to ensure that the three main objectives of the Official Languages Act are met: Ensure the equality of English and French in Parliament, the Government of Canada, the federal administration and the institutions subject to the Official Languages Act; Support the preservation and development of official language minority communities in Canada; Promote the equality of English and French in Canadian society.
Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick New Brunswick Official Languages Act The Languages Commissioner was created by the Official Languages Act of New Brunswick in 2002. The Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick is an independent agent of the Legislative Assembly. Her role is to investigate, report on, and make recommendations with regards to compliance with the Official Languages Act. She is also responsible for the promotion of the advancement of both official languages in the province.
Commissariat aux services en français de l’Ontario French Language Act The French Language Services Commissioner has a mandate to conduct independent investigations under the French Language Services Act, either in response to complaints or on his own initiative, to prepare reports on his investigations, and to monitor the progress made by government agencies in the delivery of French-language services in Ontario.
Language Commissioner for Nunavut Official Languages Act; Inuit Language Protection Act The Languages Commissioner receives, investigates and reports on complaints from the public regarding violations of the language rights contained in the Official Languages Act. Although the Languages Commissioner is appointed by the Legislative Assembly, she is independent of the government.
 

Institution Legislation Description
CHRC Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime Criminal Justice Policy and Criminal Code The mandate of the OFOVC relates exclusively to matters of federal jurisdiction and enables the Office: to promote access by victims to existing federal programs and services for victims; to address complaints of victims about compliance with the provisions of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act that apply to victims of crimes committed by offenders under federal jurisdiction; to promote awareness of the needs and concerns of victims and the applicable laws that benefit victims of crime, including to promote the principles set out in the Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime with respect to matters of federal jurisdiction, among criminal justice personnel and policy makers; to identify and review emerging and systemic issues, including those issues related to programs and services provided or administered by the Department of Justice or the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, that impact negatively on victims of crime; and to facilitate access by victims to existing federal programs and services by providing them with information and referrals.

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